Financing federal-aid highways
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Financing federal-aid highways

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in

Subjects:

  • Roads -- United States -- Finance,
  • Federal aid to transportation -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesFinancing federal aid highways
ContributionsUnited States. Federal Highway Administration
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Paginationiv, 44 p.
Number of Pages44
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17998660M

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Introduction. Because of a continuing demand for information concerning the financing of Federal-aid highways, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) prepared a report, "Financing Federal-Aid Highways," in January to describe the basic process involved. Get this from a library! Financing federal-aid highways.. [United States. Federal Highway Administration. Office of Legislative and Governmental Affairs.;]. The Federal Aid Highway Act of , popularly known as the National Interstate and Defense Highways Act (Public Law ), was enacted on J , when President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the bill into law. With an original authorization of $25 billion for the construction of 41, miles (66, km) of the Interstate Highway System supposedly over a year period, it was the Enacted by: the 84th United States Congress. The Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways, commonly known as the Interstate Highway System, is a network of controlled-access highways that forms part of the National Highway System in the United States. Construction of the system was authorized by the Federal Aid Highway Act of The system extends throughout the contiguous United States and has routes in Formed: J

§ Transferability of Federal-aid highway funds § Vehicle weight limitations—Interstate System § Public hearings § Toll roads, bridges, tunnels, and ferries § Railway-highway crossings § Control of outdoor advertising § Payments on . Highways Green Book, Volume 3 Highways Green Book, American Automobile Association: Contributor: American Automobile Association: Publisher: American automobile association, Original from: the University of Michigan: Digitized: May 8, Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan. Guide to Federal-Aid Programs and Projects – A complete listing of all Federal-aid highway programs and the various requirements associated with each. This website provides information on all . Box 30 Financing -- Federal Highway System [Federal Aid Highway Act of ] Box 33 General Location of National System of Interstate Highways [DOC report, ] Boxes [55 folders re Highways] Box 38 Highways-Legislative History Interstate System [] Box 38 Highways-Legislative Intent-Urban Areas [Sept. report].

Texas Road Finance (Part I) Paying for Highways and Byways by Ginger Lowry and TJ Costello Published May Texas’ highway network, the nation’s largest, is the backbone of its economy. Our economic growth depends in large part on the efficiency, reliability and safety of our highways and transportation systems, which support individual mobility needs as well as commerce and industry. Because of a continuing demand for information concerning the financing of Federal-aid highways, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) prepared a report, "Financing Federal-Aid Highways," in January to describe the basic process involved. The report was modified and updated in June , May , October , November , and May   This book has been written to record for posterity the story of highway development in the United States, beginning in the early years of the new Nation and expanding with the growing country as it moved into the undeveloped areas west of the original colonial States, and ultimately evolving into the Federal-aid highway program in which the.   Rethinking America’s Highways Published. I’m pleased to announce that this month marks the release of my book, Rethinking America’s Highways, published by the University of Chicago Press. Its basic point is that the institutions of funding and managing highways that evolved in 20th century America are increasingly outdated.